By Jon Egie

 

Chief Omubaye Pius

Education Secretary for Ughelli North Local Government Education Authority, Chief Pius Omubaye has expressed satisfaction with the performance of two recipients of the Teachers Merit Award recently presented by the Ministry of Basic Education.

Pastor Mrs Doris Esedafe And Mrs Florence Owumi, both head teacher and classroom teacher of Agbarha primary school, Agbarha-Otor in Ughelli North local government area, emerged as recipients of the best head teacher and third best classroom teacher in Delta state respectively during the Teachers Merit Award ceremony held in Asaba.

In an exclusive interview, Chief Omubaye said the performance of the recipients brought honour to the local government primary education sector stressing however that the feat was the result of a roadmap he had set for improvement on the primary education sector, which fell in line with the directives of the Commissioner of Basic Education, Chief Patrick Ukah .

“I felt great and promoted by the awards. It was a testimony of the fact that we have been doing some good work. It was a harvest of honour backed with cash and I am satisfied with their performance.”

He said the honour would intensify his efforts at encouraging the teachers and head teachers in the local government to be more committed to duty “without making room for ‘eye-service’ so that by the next edition of the award we could retain and even improve on our performance.”

The Education Secretary said the feat though laudable, did not come cheap as he had earlier on assumption of office, and based on his experience as a retired personnel of the Ministry of Education, harped on the do’s and don’ts of public primary school system, stressing on the existing education regulation which states that basic education is “free and compulsory”.

On that premise, he said, he had read a Riot Act to the head teachers and classroom teachers to be committed to duty and stay away from acts that fall under the category of professional misconduct.

“I told them to have nothing to do with illegal collection of money. No head teacher should ask for money before granting admission, no money should be collected for school uniforms rather; head teachers should prepare a sample of the uniforms and let parents sew them to specifications for their children. Under no circumstance should any child be sent home. Where a project or fund is to be raised, head teacher should liaise with the Parents Teachers Association and whatever resolution they reach should be documented and appropriately communicated to the Commissioner of Basic Education for approval.

“We have embarked on effective monitoring of teaching and learning in accordance with the Curriculum and using books recommended and approved by the Ministry of Education and though there has been no report of deviation from the prescribed standard, we intend to go deeper by engaging on one-on one interaction with pupils and parents to ferret grey areas and improve on them.”

He added that the authority has also ensured cleanliness of school premises and appealed to rural community leaders to assist in clearing the bushes around schools in such localities.

He said he has charged head teachers not to sell book but provide list of books for the pupils, allow pupils demonstrate hands-on skill acquisition with their own materials for craft in the classroom while the teachers supervise them.

But he observed a dearth in man power supply among teaching staff in schools in rural communities whereas there is a dense concentration of teachers in the schools in the urban areas and hence, carried out a redistribution of teaching staff “so that all schools in the local government area can come to a level of equity in terms of staffing because the children in the rural and urban areas all use the same Curriculum and write the same assessment tests.

He however lamented undue pressure on him by stakeholders in his effort to redistribute teachers across the local government area saying that though he is looking at genuine cases of complaints, “I will remain firm on my action especially on cases that have no genuine basis for complaints”.

According to him, there are less than 1000 teachers in the 73 public schools in the local government area pointing out that a school like Agbarho Model Primary School with pupil population of over 2000 that needs a minimum of 50 teachers has only 40 teachers and in comparison, Aragba Primay School in Orogun which ought to have at least seven teachers has only one teacher and the head teacher, “and this is a challenge” he said.

Ughelli North Education Secretary expresses satisfaction with performance of merit award recipients

By Jon Egie

Education Secretary for Ughelli North Local Government Education Authority, Chief Pius Omubaye has expressed satisfaction with the performance of two recipients of the Teachers Merit Award recently presented by the Ministry of Basic Education.

Pastor Mrs Doris Esedafe And Mrs Florence Owumi, both head teacher and classroom teacher of Agbarha primary school, Agbarha-Otor in Ughelli North local government area, emerged as recipients of the best head teacher and third best classroom teacher in Delta state respectively during the Teachers Merit Award ceremony held in Asaba.

In an exclusive interview, Chief Omubaye said the performance of the recipients brought honour to the local government primary education sector stressing however that the feat was the result of a roadmap he had set for improvement on the primary education sector, which fell in line with the directives of the Commissioner of Basic Education, Chief Patrick Ukah .

“I felt great and promoted by the awards. It was a testimony of the fact that we have been doing some good work. It was a harvest of honour backed with cash and I am satisfied with their performance.”

He said the honour would intensify his efforts at encouraging the teachers and head teachers in the local government to be more committed to duty “without making room for ‘eye-service’ so that by the next edition of the award we could retain and even improve on our performance.”

The Education Secretary said the feat though laudable, did not come cheap as he had earlier on assumption of office, and based on his experience as a retired personnel of the Ministry of Education, harped on the do’s and don’ts of public primary school system, stressing on the existing education regulation which states that basic education is “free and compulsory”.

On that premise, he said, he had read a Riot Act to the head teachers and classroom teachers to be committed to duty and stay away from acts that fall under the category of professional misconduct.

“I told them to have nothing to do with illegal collection of money. No head teacher should ask for money before granting admission, no money should be collected for school uniforms rather; head teachers should prepare a sample of the uniforms and let parents sew them to specifications for their children. Under no circumstance should any child be sent home. Where a project or fund is to be raised, head teacher should liaise with the Parents Teachers Association and whatever resolution they reach should be documented and appropriately communicated to the Commissioner of Basic Education for approval.

“We have embarked on effective monitoring of teaching and learning in accordance with the Curriculum and using books recommended and approved by the Ministry of Education and though there has been no report of deviation from the prescribed standard, we intend to go deeper by engaging on one-on one interaction with pupils and parents to ferret grey areas and improve on them.”

He added that the authority has also ensured cleanliness of school premises and appealed to rural community leaders to assist in clearing the bushes around schools in such localities.

He said he has charged head teachers not to sell book but provide list of books for the pupils, allow pupils demonstrate hands-on skill acquisition with their own materials for craft in the classroom while the teachers supervise them.

But he observed a dearth in man power supply among teaching staff in schools in rural communities whereas there is a dense concentration of teachers in the schools in the urban areas and hence, carried out a redistribution of teaching staff “so that all schools in the local government area can come to a level of equity in terms of staffing because the children in the rural and urban areas all use the same Curriculum and write the same assessment tests.

He however lamented undue pressure on him by stakeholders in his effort to redistribute teachers across the local government area saying that though he is looking at genuine cases of complaints, “I will remain firm on my action especially on cases that have no genuine basis for complaints”.

According to him, there are less than 1000 teachers in the 73 public schools in the local government area pointing out that a school like Agbarho Model Primary School with pupil population of over 2000 that needs a minimum of 50 teachers has only 40 teachers and in comparison, Aragba Primay School in Orogun which ought to have at least seven teachers has only one teacher and the head teacher, “and this is a challenge” he said.